Monthly Archives: August 2017

The main function should be shunned

The main function (in languages that have it) is…. special. It’s the entry point of the program by convention, there can only be one of them in all the object files being linked, and you can’t run a program without it. And it’s inflexible.

Its presence means that the final output has to be an executable. It’s likely however, that the executable in question might have code that others might rather reuse than rewrite, but they won’t be able to use it in their own executables. There’s already a main function in there. Before clang nobody seemed to stumble on the idea that a compiler as a library would be a great idea. And yet…

This is why I’m now advocating for always putting the main function of an executable in its own file, all by itself. And also that it do the least amount of work possible for maximum flexibility. This way, any executable project is one excluded file away in the build system from being used as a library. This is how I’d start a, say, C++ executable project from scratch today:

#include "runtime.hpp"
#include <iostream>
#include <stdexcept>

int main(int argc, const char* argv[]) {
    try {
        run(argc, argv); // "real" main
        return 0;
    } catch(const std::exception& ex) {
        std::cout << "Oops: " << ex.what() << std::endl;
        return 1;
    }
}

In fact, I think I’ll go write an Emacs snippet for that right now.

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API clarity with types

API design is hard. Really hard. It’s one of the reasons I like TDD – it forces you to use the API as a regular client and it usually comes out all the better for it. At a previous job we’d design APIs as C headers, review them without implementation and call it done. Not one of those didn’t have to change as soon as we tried implementing them.

The Win32 API is rife with examples of what not to do: functions with 12 parameters aren’t uncommon. Another API no-no is several parameters of the same type – which means which? This is ok:

auto p = Point(2, 3);

It’s obvious that 2 is the x coordinate and 3 is y. But:

foo("foo", "bar", "baz", "quux", true);

Sure, the actual strings passed don’t help – but what does true mean in this context? Languages like Python get around this by naming arguments at the call site, but that’s not a feature of most curly brace/semicolon languages.

I semi-recently forked and extended the D wrapper for nanomsg. The original C API copies the Berkely sockets API, for reasons I don’t quite understand. That means that a socket must be created, then bound or connect to another socket. In an OOP-ish language we’d like to just have a contructor deal with that for us. Unfortunately, there’s no way to disambiguate if we want to connect to an address or bind to it – in both cases a string is passed. My first attempt was to follow in Java’s footsteps and use static methods for creation (simplified for the blog post):

struct NanoSocket {
    static NanoSocket createBound(string uri) { /* ... */ }
    static NanoSocket createConnected(string uri) { /* ... */ }
    private this() { /* ... */ } // constructor
}

I never did feel comfortable: object creation shouldn’t look *weird*. But I think Haskell has forever changed by brain, so types to the rescue:

struct NanoSocket {
    this(ConnectTo connectTo) { /* ... */ }
    this(BindTo bindTo) { /* ... */ }
}

struct ConnectTo {
    string uri;
}

struct BindTo {
    string uri;
}

I encountered something similar when I implemented a method on NanoSocket called trySend. It takes two durations: a total time to try for, and an interval to wait to try again. Most people would write it like so:

void trySend(ubyte[] data, 
             Duration totalDuration, 
             Duration retryDuration);

At the call site clients might get confused about which order the durations are in. I think this is much better, since there’s no way to get it wrong:

void trySend(ubyte[] data, 
             TotalDuration totalDuration, 
             RetryDuration retryDuration);

struct TotalDuration {
    Duration duration;
}

struct RetryDuration {
    Duration duration;
}

What do you think?

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