Monthly Archives: July 2016

C is not magically fast, part 2

I wrote a blog post before about how C is not magically fast, but the sentiment that C has properties lacking in other languages that make it so is still widespread. It was with no surprise at all then that a colleague mentioned something resembling that recently at lunch break, and I attempted to tell him why it wasn’t (at least always) true.

He asked for an example where C++ would be faster, and I resorted to the old sort classic: C++ sort is faster than C’s qsort because of templates and inlining. He then asked me if I’d ever measured it myself, and since I hadn’t, I did just that after lunch. I included D as well because, well, it’s my favourite language. Taking the minimum time after ten runs each to sort a random array of 10M simple structs on my laptop yielded the results below:

  • D: 1.147s
  • C++: 1.723s
  • C: 1.789s

I expected  C++ to be faster than C, I didn’t expect the difference to be so small. I expected D to be the same speed as C++, but for some reason it’s faster. I haven’t investigated the reason why for lack of interest, but maybe because of how strings are handled?

I used the same compiler backend for all 3 so that wouldn’t be an influence: LLVM. I also seeded all of them with the same number and used the same random number generator: the awful srand from C’s standard library. It’s terrible, but it’s the only easy way to do it in standard C and the same function is available from the other two languages. I also only timed the sort, not counting init code.

The code for all 3 implementations:

// sort.c
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/time.h>
#include <sys/resource.h>

typedef struct {
    int i;
    char* s;
} Foo;

double get_time() {
    struct timeval t;
    struct timezone tzp;
    gettimeofday(&t, &tzp);
    return t.tv_sec + t.tv_usec*1e-6;
}

int comp(const void* lhs_, const void* rhs_) {
    const Foo *lhs = (const Foo*)lhs_;
    const Foo *rhs = (const Foo*)rhs_;
    if(lhs->i < rhs->i) return -1;
    if(lhs->i > rhs->i) return 1;
    return strcmp(lhs->s, rhs->s);
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    if(argc < 2) {
        fprintf(stderr, "Must pass in number of elements\n");
        return 1;
    }

    srand(1337);
    const int size = atoi(argv[1]);
    Foo* foos = malloc(size * sizeof(Foo));
    for(int i = 0; i < size; ++i) {
        foos[i].i = rand() % size;
        foos[i].s = malloc(100);
        sprintf(foos[i].s, "foo%dfoo", foos[i].i);
    }

    const double start = get_time();
    qsort(foos, size, sizeof(Foo), comp);
    const double end = get_time();
    printf("Sort time: %lf\n", end - start);

    free(foos);
    return 0;
}


// sort.cpp
#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <chrono>
#include <cstring>

using namespace std;
using namespace chrono;

struct Foo {
    int i;
    string s;

    bool operator<(const Foo& other) const noexcept {
        if(i < other.i) return true;
        if(i > other.i) return false;
        return s < other.s;
    }

};


template<typename CLOCK, typename START>
static double getElapsedSeconds(CLOCK clock, const START start) {
    //cast to ms first to get fractional amount of seconds
    return duration_cast<milliseconds>(clock.now() - start).count() / 1000.0;
}

#include <type_traits>
int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    if(argc < 2) {
        cerr << "Must pass in number of elements" << endl;
        return 1;
    }

    srand(1337);
    const int size = stoi(argv[1]);
    vector<Foo> foos(size);
    for(auto& foo: foos) {
        foo.i = rand() % size;
        foo.s = "foo"s + to_string(foo.i) + "foo"s;
    }

    high_resolution_clock clock;
    const auto start = clock.now();
    sort(foos.begin(), foos.end());
    cout << "Sort time: " << getElapsedSeconds(clock, start) << endl;
}


// sort.d
import std.stdio;
import std.exception;
import std.datetime;
import std.algorithm;
import std.conv;
import core.stdc.stdlib;


struct Foo {
    int i;
    string s;

    int opCmp(ref Foo other) const @safe pure nothrow {
        if(i < other.i) return -1;
        if(i > other.i) return 1;
        return s < other.s
            ? -1
            : (s > other.s ? 1 : 0);
    }
}

void main(string[] args) {
    enforce(args.length > 1, "Must pass in number of elements");
    srand(1337);
    immutable size = args[1].to!int;
    auto foos = new Foo[size];
    foreach(ref foo; foos) {
        foo.i = rand % size;
        foo.s = "foo" ~ foo.i.to!string ~ "foo";
    }

    auto sw = StopWatch();
    sw.start;
    sort(foos);
    sw.stop;
    writeln("Elapsed: ", cast(Duration)sw.peek);
}



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Dipping my toes in the property based testing pool

I’ve heard a lot about property-based testing in the last 2 years but haven’t really had a chance to try it out. I first heard about it when I was learning Haskell, but at the time I thought regular bog-standard unit testing was a better option. I didn’t want to learn a new language (and one notoriously difficult at that) and a new way of testing at the same time. Since then I haven’t written anything else in Haskell for multiple reasons and it’s always been something I’ve been wanting to try out.

I decided that the best way to do it is just to implement property-based testing myself, and I’ve started with preliminary support in my unit-threaded library for basic types and arrays thereof. The main issue was knowing how to write the new tests. It wasn’t clear at all and if you’re in the same situation I highly recommend this talk on the subject. Fortunately, one of the examples in those slides was serialization, and since I wrote a library for that too, I immediately started transitioning some pre-existing unit tests. I have to say that I believe the new tests are much, much better. Here’s one test “on paper” but that actually runs 100 random examples for each of the 17 types mentioned in the code, checking that serializing then deserializing should yield the same value:

@Types!(bool, byte, ubyte, short, ushort, int, uint, long, ulong,
        float, double,
        char, wchar, dchar,
        ubyte[], ushort[], int[])
void testEncodeDecodeProperty(T)() {
    check!((T val) {
        auto enc = Cerealiser();
        enc ~= val;
        auto dec = Decerealiser(enc.bytes);
        return dec.value!T == val;
    });
}

I think that’s a pretty good test/SLOC ratio. Now I just have to find more applications for this.