main is just another function

Last week I talked about code that isn’t unit-testable, at least not by my definition of what a unit test is. In keeping with that, this blog post will talk about testing code that has side-effects.

Recently I’d come to accept a defeatist attitude where I couldn’t think of any other way to test that passing certain command-line options to a console binary had a certain effect. I mean, the whole point is to test that running the app differently will have different consequences. As a result I ended up only ever doing end-to-end testing. And… that’s simply not where I want to be.

Then it dawned on me: main is just another function. Granted, it has a special status that makes it so you can’t call it directly from a test, but nearly all my main functions lately have looked like this:

int main(string[] args) {
    try {
        doStuff(args);
        return 0;
    } catch(Exception ex) {
        stderr.writeln(ex.msg);
        return 1;
    }
}

It should be easy enough to translate this to the equivalent C++ in your head. With main so conveniently delegating to a function that does real work, I can now easily write integration tests. After all, is there really any difference between:

doStuff(["myapp", "--option", "arg1", "arg2"]);
// assert stuff happened

And (in, say, a shell script):

./myapp --option arg1 arg2
# assert stuff happened

I’d say no. This way I have one end-to-end test for sanity’s sake, and everything else being tested from the same binary by calling the “real” main function directly.

If your main doesn’t look like the one above, and you happen to be writing C or C++, there’s another technique: use the preprocessor to rename main to something else and call it from your integration/component test. And then, as they say, Bob’s your uncle.

Happy testing!

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One thought on “main is just another function

  1. alexmatto says:

    Nice! Very simple, but a very good practice for making your code more testable 😉

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