unit-threaded: now an executable library

It’s one of those ideas that seem obvious in retrospect, but somehow only ocurred to me last week. Let me explain.

I wrote a unit testing library in D called unit-threaded. It uses D’s compile-time reflection capabilities so that no test registration is required. You write your tests, they get found automatically and everything is good and nice. Except… you have to list the files you want to reflect on, explicitly. D’s compiler can’t go reading the filesystem for you while it compiles, so a pre-build step of generating the file list was needed. I wrote a program to do it, but for several reasons it wasn’t ideal.

Now, as someone who actually wants people to use my library (and also to make it easier for myself), I had to find a way so that it would be easy to opt-in to unit-threaded. This is especially important since D has built-in unit tests, so the barrier for entry is low (which is a good thing!). While working on a far crazier idea to make it a no-brainer to use unit-threaded, I stumbled across my current solution: run the library as an executable binary.

The secret sauce that makes this work is dub, D’s package manager. It can download dependencies to compile and even run them with “dub run”. That way, a user need not even have to download it. The other dub feature that makes this feasible is that it supports “configurations” in which a package is built differently. And using those, I can have a regular library configuration and an alternative executable one. Since dub run can take a configuration as an argument, unit-threaded can now be run as a program with “dub run unit-threaded -c gen_ut_main”. And when it is, it generates the file that’s needed to make it all work.

So now all a user need to is add a declaration to their project’s dub.json file and “dub test” works as intended, using unit-threaded underneath, with named unit tests and all of them running in threads by default. Happy days.

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